Friday, June 20, 2014

Halfway Home

As we're halfway through the year -- my second year back from sabbatical -- I thought this might be a good time to take stock. There is good news and bad news here, depending on what you like to read and what you were hoping to see from me in the future.

I keep reading bizarro comments about how I've barely been writing since sabbatical, but actually I think my output is pretty much back to normal.


Written on or since sabbatical:


Green Glass Beads (this was actually completed at the point of my most extreme point of burn-out, when I could not bear to write, could not stand to even think of writing -- yet no one seemed to see this in the work, so maybe it WAS all in my head)
Perfect Day
Blood Red Butterfly
I Spy Something Christmas

Haunted Heart: Winter
In Plain Sight
The Parting Glass
Kick Start
Merry Christmas, Darling (Christmas Codas - various)
Stranger Things Have Happened: AE CYOA
Stranger on the Shore
Everything I Know


That's everything, I think.

Okay, well, I guess it looks like I'm writing less in general -- partly because I'm trying to stick to my sabbatical-conceived rule of taking enough time off and keeping the creative well filled. (Oh, and getting exercise.) And of course, I did always mostly write novellas, but I always did short stories too, and the sole post-sabbatical novel is longer than most of my other novels -- and there will be two more full-length novels this year -- so I think my output is back to normal. It's more a matter of smoothing out the production schedule now that I have so many other things to deal with.

Maybe I'm experimenting more? Yes, probably. With formats (the CYOA book) and content (Blood Red Butterfly). Some experiments are more successful than others, but everything has earned out. So far, so good. That said, experiments are kind of tricky because while we all, as readers, pride ourselves on being open and even eager for creative experiments, the truth is...are we? Of course not! What addict wants a supplier experimenting and getting creative with their fix? What we readers really want is for our favorite author to keep writing our favorite book, only make it somehow new in this version. In other words...can you somehow up the dosage?
 
And the answer is no.

But then again, I've always experimented with genre, theme, format. A Vintage Affair was certainly experimental. The White Knight. The Petit Morts. I like to try different things.

So maybe it's just back to status quo? Only now I'm a lot more relaxed? I'm having more fun?

I can see from the enthusiastic response to Stranger on the Shore that readers want more novels and they want those novels to be classic mystery novels. Which works for me. It's what I most enjoy too. I just have to time everything more carefully than I did this year. Six months between releases and then a flood of everything coming out in the final six months of the year is not ideal. Yes, I did notice that!

So taking a look at the remainder of 2014 and what I had initially hoped to do, I think realistically I'm cutting everything in favor of the two remaining novels.

Fair Play
Boy with the Painful Tattoo


Fair Play is November. BWTPT will likely be September/October. (And yes, it is half-written now, so it is really happening.)

Those are the two releases you can rely on for this year. Everything -- if there is anything -- else is bonus. And that leaves...a lot of very disappointed readers, I know. I'm not happy about that either.

So the newly revised Coming But I'm Not Giving an Actual Date list is:

Winter Kill
Ill Met by Moonlight
Slay Ride
Bite Club
The Mermaid Murders
Shadow on the Sun
Blind Side


These are things I know will be written. But I'm not giving dates. That just makes us all crazy.

There are other projects that I want to do -- the sequel to The Ghost Wore Yellow Socks (oddly turning out to be my most translated title) a number of holiday stories, etc. One thing post-sabbatical is I have so many ideas, and there really is not going to be enough time to write them all. And, in honesty, probably they all aren't worth writing anyway. Not every idea is strong enough to carry a coherent story.

And some of the ideas -- like the short story about a guy who is recovering from a stroke and is haunted by a ghost and ends up dying...I'm going to guess you probably wouldn't be too terribly thrilled with (genuinely creepy though it is).

Anyway, moving forward I'm going to try not to officially announce anything I'm not absolutely positive will be completed within eighteen months. I think that's less wear and tear on all of us. One project a year will be through a publisher and the rest will be through my own publishing imprint.

So that's where we are!  What do you think?

73 comments:

  1. What do I like to see and what do I hope for from you? Easy. I like to see you happy with your work. I hope you'll finish a story or two....eventually. I'm always fascinated with how you try to merge the creative mind with the practical. It works better for you than most people I know. I say, just keep doing what feels right for you at the moment. We'll all benefit that way. The only thing I'm not sure I agree with is the comment about your readers preferring your classic mysteries. Yes, I love them, but what I love more is when you 'mix it up,' so to speak. I love Perfect Day and Haunted Heart mixed in with Stranger On The Shore. I think maybe I appreciate one more because of the other. I say, let your creative freak fly and go easy on yourself. Don't stress. Tell anyone who pushes for more, " Ok, you write the next one yourself." See how that works for them. ;)

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    1. Have I mentioned lately how wise I think you are? ;-)

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  2. I think you are one of the most prolific writers out there currently, and as a writer who meets all my expectations as a reader. I like very much your books and I have to read many who still have not been able to because I am Spanish and a little hard for me to understand perfectly. But the effort is worth it. The important thing is that you are satisfied and enjoyed what you do because it benefits us all. For me it is perfect. I am very grateful for their good books. Thanks. Gracias

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    1. Thank you so much, FGC. I appreciate those kind words.

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  3. I think you've been doing great, but then, I'm looking at it mainly from the perspective of another writer. :) My own production goes up and down, and sometimes I'm working on five things at once and it looks from the outside like I'm doing nothing, while other times I get a bunch of stories finished bam-bam-bam. I know how it goes, and looking at what you've published since you came back, I'm impressed.

    My reader persona would love to see another half dozen Holmes and Moriarity books in the next couple years [duck] but my writer persona gets that you're writing whatever you want to write, and that I'll probably love at least most of it. [grin]

    Good job, keep going. :D

    Angie

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    1. Yes, post-sabbatical I returned to my early habits of jumping from project to project. So at any given time I'm working on a couple of different things (five at this very moment -- well, at THIS moment all my focus is on finishing Fair Play for Carina, but a few weeks ago I was leap-frogging). I think this keeps everything fresh and interesting, but it also means long stretches where everything is in progress and nothing is published...and then five projects in six months.

      Not ideal!

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  4. Wise words, dear Josh. I can sincerely say that as long as you enjoy writing, as long as you feel happy and relaxed, I'm satisfied too. I think your readers are willing to wait, to agree with your pace. I'm actually extremely proud of you and the way you've managed to rearrange your working habits after your burn-out — to me it's truly inspirational.

    The list of stories you've written since sabbatical is so long! To think that you've accomplished all that while attending to everything related to your enterprise is... just amazing. AND you managed to still stay happy! Wow. *wide eyed with awe* ;-)

    Why stress yourself with publishing release dates if you don't absolutely have to? Your plan not to officially announce anything you aren't absolutely positive will be completed in the near future sounds healthy and sane. :-)

    And about experimenting: I'm all for experimenting. The way I see it any growth can't happen if one doesn't experiment (at least a bit). This is very important for an artist, I think.

    And one more thing. I'm happy to see you are trying to keep your December as stress free as possible this year — right?!

    Take care, be well, Josh. :-)

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    1. Thank you, Johanna. I thought it wasn't too shabby a list, once I went through and started listing everything. I think perhaps people don't realize that the sabbatical was 2011. I've been back a couple of years now -- and sold a lot of books since then!

      SotS is the only novel so far, and maybe that's what they really mean. Haunted Heart, was a short novel -- and it certainly had an enthusiastic response from readers -- but it wasn't a real mystery and it wasn't a satisfying romance. (But it's first in a series. There has to be an arc.)

      So maybe for some readers Stranger on the Shore is the "real" return?

      I do not plan to write a single damn thing in December!

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    2. I will hold you to that promise about December. :-)

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  5. Oh, and I can't say I'm not pleased that we'll get to have two major release parties in your Goodreads group next autumn. :-D

    *runs to buy more paper plates and cocktail sticks*

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    1. Olives! Don't forget the olives! Must have olives for the martinis. :-D

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    2. Those and limes are on the top of my grocery list, I promise. ;-)

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  6. First of all, I think that the most important thing is for you to be happy with/in your work, which is why i'm very happy to hear that you're taking care of yourself a bit more and that you're happy with the writing :-)

    Second, that is a VERY impressive output! And the future plans are wonderful! I love mysteries so i'm looking forward to those, but i'm also looking forward to any writing experiments you have in mind. In all your stories there's so much to think about, so many fun details, and these come across in all your work. And though i admit to liking certain formulas, what it's really about is the story and how it's written, the response it elicits, so i don't really expect these formulas as such, and i trust your writing, and i like surprises (and i know they'll be awesome surprises :-))

    Please take care and have fun writing :-)

    p.s. oh, and in the story that will probably not get written about the guy and the ghost, is the haunting a nice haunting, and does the guy who would've died end up with the ghost and so gets his happy-ever-AFTER with the ghost? just wondering... ;-)

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    1. Thanks, KC.

      Wellllll, you know that ghost was not a very nice ghost. In fact, I think what freaked me out about that story was it was fairly cruel. And I don't like cruelty. Even for the pleasure of scaring the hell out of everyone.

      But then, I've had some other fairly unpleasant ideas that softened into good little stories, so we'll see...

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  7. Sounds good and sane to me. :)

    I think three novels in a year is *more* than reasonable, with (maybe) a few smaller projects scattered in as a surprise, if there's time for them. If all of my favorite authors wrote at that speed, I would probably have to give up living my own life to read fiction full-time. As far as production schedules go, I do think it's a good idea to keep it sparse and surprise us with extras, if possible--and if not, no problem!

    And as a nurse, I really do support the idea of scratching out time to exercise. ;P

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    1. Thank you! This is what I love about summer. I'm walking, I'm swimming...I just feel so good right now. And feeling healthy pays off in both creativity and productivity.

      Once upon a time 3 novels a year would have been considered fantastic output. But the model has definitely changed. Not sure if it's going to result in better books and longer-lived authors, but it is what it is.

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  8. Did I miss a post? Is there a synopsis for the Mermaid Murders and Blind Side?

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    1. Blind Side is Dangerous Ground 6. I will say only that this will be a novel and it will be a full mystery.

      The Mermaid Murders is an FBI thriller, but I'm undecided as to whether I am going to try and pitch it or write it for my own imprint.

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  9. I was aways in the ''don't-worry-be-happy'' team for what concerns you, so I'm totally pleased at your announcement.

    >> What addict wants a supplier experimenting and getting creative with their fix?

    LOL! I had to laugh at this, but I don't think it is true for the majority of us.

    Be well!

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    1. :-D :-D :-D

      Well, I understand those readers. I am the same in my TV viewing. I want what I like, and I want it the same forever. Only different enough that it feels like I am getting that first hit all over again.

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  10. What do I think? I think your output since your sabbatical has been nothing but quality. And I think you go out of your way to keep your readers informed about what's going on and what's coming up; just another example of your generosity to us.

    But in reality I think the important question is: what do you think? Are you hapyy with what you have planned? Because a happy Josh is a productive Josh. Some of your readers may grumble about this or that story not being written, but the bottom line is, you have to write what you want, when you want to write it. Otherwise we all lose.

    Hope you continue to take the time to enjoy your garden and pool. :)

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    1. Thank you, Susan.

      Well, I guess you have put your finger on it. It is *kind* of a rhetorical question because this is the way it is. :-D Like it or not.

      But of course, I want readers to understand why I am making the choices that I am. It's not a wish to deny them the stories they would most like to read. I'm working in a way that I believe will make for better stories -- and even for more stories in the end.

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  11. Even your 'reduced output' looks pretty damned impressive to me! It makes me cross when I hear that people have been complaining. If it's any comfort, they must have done it to Shakespeare too...

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    1. Well, so many writers now function like coin-operated juke boxes, both in speed and content, I can see that there's some irritation with a writer who Doesn't Seem to Be Listening to Us. ;-)

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  12. I really don't see that we as readers have any right to be disappointed about whatever you choose to do. of course we al have our favourite characters and, as you say, would like more of them. But the fact is that whatever you write is so good that we will enjoy it and will be grateful for it. And we do not want to put any pressure on you which might (metaphorically speaking) kill the golden goose i.e. your ability to write.

    You must keep yourself rested and refreshed both physically and, by writing what you want to write, mentally too. I'm delighted to see that you're going to focus on classic mystery novels, since I love them too.

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    1. Thank you, Helena. I think the disappointment and even anger that some readers feel compelled to express is probably testament to how important stories are in our lives, and how invested we feel in the storytelling process.

      I know one of the most startling things for new authors is how angry, even bitter so many "critical" reviews are. And it is clear that it is more than a matter of oh-this-author-wrote-a-book-I'm-not-that-crazy-about. It's a weird, emotional dynamic. And maybe it gets back to the power of storytelling. A writer can make a reader feel -- and the reader really has no power against that, even when they resent what they're feeling.

      That sabbatical was the best move I ever made. I love writing again -- I am excited to get to work every morning. I have more stories in mind than I will ever have time to tell.

      At the same time, and I feel much more hardnosed about writing whatever I choose to write. And when. I want to be fair to readers and not promise what I can't deliver in the foreseeable future, but I also feel justified in stopping work when I am tired or needing a break. And that is probably the biggest change, and one reason why -- despite this fairly grueling work schedule -- I am happy and enthusiastic about writing.

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  13. I agree with the others who've mentioned your attention and generosity to your readers, including keeping us in touch with your plans, and asking for feedback. I'd surmise that any reader preference (measured by some combination of sales and ratings?) for your classic mystery novels may have something to do with that that genre is more popular overall. And also that you do it so well.

    A lot of us have more diverse taste, and we love your diversity and experiments. Stranger Things, your CYOA "experiment" was like this amazing gift to your readers, because no one can really get it (get all of it) unless they've read most or all of the AE series. That's a very generous act, not the sort of gesture that's a trifle.

    I've spent my months, even years waiting for books promised by other authors. Sometimes I've moved on by the time those books actually arrived, but I don't see that as a major worry in this case. We really are happy when you're happy about your work. Because it shows in the results, in your engaging, high quality stories.

    The Green Glass Beads confession is kind of a shock, that story seems so lovingly crafted, I'd never have guessed your state of mind at that time. It's another of my favorites.

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    1. GGB is the most snarly with an editor and disinterested in the story that I have EVER been. It took every bit of control I had not to say, "Just do whatever you want, don't bother me." I was DONE. To a crisp.

      I felt like I was writing in a foreign language. Literally. I had to literally think about every sentence. That's how hard it was to write.

      Which seems funny to me now. If I look closely at the story, I see a certain stiffness. But it's pretty obvious no one else saw it. (And if they see it now, it will be obvious they read this blog). ;-D

      Here's the thing I have come to realize as an author -- it's not a joyful recognition, but it is a fact. Readers move on. They move on, even when you hit your deadlines and they love you. Not all of them, but a certain percentage. Because everything we write -- no matter how different -- is still pretty much the same.

      And readers have their fill and move on to something else. Now many of them eventually circle back, but some of them don't. And this is why the quest is always on for new readers. Because your old base suffers attrition. No matter who you are or what you write.

      And in fact our modern publishing schedule of something every few months probably accelerates that process.

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  14. You said the magic words for me, BWTPT, anything else for me is happy surprise. I am definitely looking forward to Fair Play too. Thanks for the update, this makes me very happy :)

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    1. What is really interesting to me are the similarities between BWTPT and Fair Play. In both books, the two sets of characters are dealing with living together and their newly changed relationships. Oh -- and the two POV characters are dealing with their desire for sexual submission. Which they handle differently -- as they handle all aspects of their lives differently.

      It's an interesting journey as the author -- and of course I hope it will be equally interesting for the readers.

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  15. I am happy to wait for you to release new content if you write wonderful books like Stranger on the Shore and the wonderful novellas you've written since you went on sabbatical. Really, you're a wonderful author and you have a wonderful backlist of titles that can keep us entertained for months at a time. And you're about the only contemporary author of romance whose books I read again and again (you've no idea how many times I've read CUTYS and Fair Game).

    Regarding the comment about the fix and our authors providing us with it and messing with the dosage, well... I must say that I did not enjoy A Vintage Affair but that has nothing to do with you and everything to do with me. I was a faithful reader (always) and read it. Maybe I should give it another try and see if I have gotten over my initial shock over you know what thing on the book. I don't know... people do grow and change their perspectives over time. I am very grateful that you're willing to experiment and go out of your comfort zone. In some ways you're challenging us to do the same and that is something very brave... very brave indeed.

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    1. Well, you know, I love many authors, but I don't love all their work equally. The fact that I have read (and tried to buy) everything Hansen wrote, doesn't mean I loved everything Hansen wrote.

      My experience as a reader is my takeaway as an author.

      I honestly do not expect that everything I write is going to be loved. It just doesn't work that way.

      By now I know when I am writing something how it is going to be received -- and by whom. :-) I could hear the wah-wah-wahs on Everything I Know before I was two thirds through the book. But should that matter to me? Should I stop work, stop exploring and experimenting because I know not everyone is going to like the experiment?

      No. Of course not.

      And the funny part is those wah-wah-wah readers would probably agree with that -- in theory. :-D

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  16. Bizarro comments indeed! You have been amazing the last year and a half! Actually two and a half years, because you weren't idle during your sabbatical. I didn't "know" you before your sabbatical. Since your return, I repeat, AMAZING.

    You left off your incredible list of audiobooks you put out. Yes, they aren't "new" works, but I have enjoyed them tremendously. The time you have spent negotiating those and selecting the most perfect narrators takes time from you writing. I am happy with the trade-off.

    You've also exerted a lot of energy on your blog. You have had at least one post a week almost every week the last two years. The lively discussions, the updates, letting us choose a narrator and covers, the interviews! That also takes time from your writing, but I loved every bit of it.

    I love your experiments. One of the reasons I love your work so much is your diversity.Please don't give that up. However, my favorites are the mysteries with a side of romance whether m/m or het.

    I think I prefer you not give dates. It makes me anxious, I can only imagine what it does to you. There is a certain book that makes me cringe every time someone asks about it. Your bonuses are like a gift. (KC, I too am wondering about whether the guy and the ghost get together in the afterlife!)

    So to make a long story short, I love, love, love whatever you do when you do it. If you are enjoying it, too, so much the better!

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    1. Thank you very much, Lori. And yes, those audio books take a tremendous -- and that was completely unexpected -- amount of time. For example, having to take thirteen hours to listen closely to something is a very big chunk of time gone when you are planning out a work month.

      The giving dates does make me anxious too. I started it, hoping it would calm readers knowing there was a projected date, but it was a mistake because not only did it not particularly calm them (then they wanted the exact week/day) it added to the problem when I started missing dates. :-D

      Better just to hand out some generic -- we're working on it!

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  17. I'm amazed how much you have done, given the 'business' of publishing you have been doing at the same time.

    I'm happy to hear you're thinking longer novels and mysteries. They're my favorites.

    You should write for yourself first though. If it's not fun it's hard work, and you don't want your dream job to turn into something that's hard work. (Well, no more than writing a novel is, really.)

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    1. Well, that's the nice thing about where I am in my creative life. I think with only two (granted, pretty major) exceptions, I've always written exactly what I wanted to write.

      That doesn't mean every story has panned out, and there are some stories I've regretted -- or at least knew would be a bust before I was finished.

      There are some scenarios that are just not going to work properly. That doesn't mean they shouldn't be explored, just that the flaws are inherent to the scenario.

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  18. In my opinion, you are a very creative writer with a well crafted, very impressing output. I have always so many stories in my brain, but if I try to get them on paper...very wooden and I don't mean the paper. The power of writing is with you, you have a voice, which is strong and clear. You are one of not so many writers, I have enjoyed every work. And you are one of my few comfort authors. I reread and rehear your books often and find new aspects there, you take me with you, so that I feel me stronger and happier, when I come out of your stories. So, please do what is healthy and enjoyable for you! I love your books, but not to the price, that you feel depressed, burnout and like a galley slave.

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    1. I am smiling picturing myself as a loudly complaining galley slave. :-D But thank you for those kind words, Sabine. I love knowing the books are a comfort read.

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  19. It's true that Stranger on the Shore has reignited my craving for your full-length, classically structured mystery. I'm happy for the coming Fair Play and Boy with painful tattoo. Like you said, anything else will be a happy bonus :-)

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    1. I think I'd originally started writing the romantic shorts because a few readers said they didn't like mysteries but liked my characters and relationships. So those were fun to do. But I hadn't realized how much I missed really digging into a story and the characters.

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  20. So excited to hear about the books that are on their way!

    Balance is so important - for everyone & in life generally - so I think it's fine (and important!) to write at the pace that suits you best! I personally think you're really productive :) No matter how many books you write, the main thing is that you are happy with them! I always tell myself that as long as I am doing things in the best way I can, at any given time, that I should value that for what it is and be happy with it ;)

    Anyway, really excited to hear about the books that are coming :) Looking forward to them all! :D

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    1. More than anything it is important to be happy in your work. I remember one of my teachers telling us this when I was in grade school. I don't think I full grasped the truth of that until my thirties!

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  21. Josh - I'm happy that you are happy, healthy, and in the writing groove. The old adage about quality vs. quantity? Yeah, that - applied to both your life and your writing. I understand about running a small business - which is definitely what you are doing. Very time and energy consuming to sort out all aspects of it, let alone find the creative time to write! Thank you once again for taking the chunks of time - and financial gamble - on the audio books - I do so love them, and notice more and more readers are discovering how wonderful they are!

    In regard to upcoming works.. I seriously don't even try to comprehend why other readers feel "disappointed" about what is coming out or when, whatever you publish is gravy to me - or, let's say... chocolate ;-) Also, I'd rather read something 2 years after you first "promised" it than get some kind of rush job that you were not happy with, but felt obligated to get to readers. Of course you need to be attentive to what is being said in your readership, but it seems you have an excellent ability to process it all into useful information. Do I love everything you have written with abandon? No, there are a few that aren't in my read over, and over and over file, but the ones I can recite by memory exceed those by miles :-D Now, go hit the pool with a nice cool drink. :-)

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    1. Dianne, that's the truth. It is a small business and there is simply no getting around the amount of time that has to be spent on non-creative stuff. Or even sometimes creative but not writing. The toughest part has been finding that balance.

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  22. Hey, I'm just excited there is more of anything to come. You've warned us all that not all characters get to be written forever. I'm intrigued by the 1 release per year via a traditional publishing house and 1 the others via your own imprint. That seems to be a complete reversal of a trend away from rights-recovery and personal imprints?

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    1. Most stuff is still coming out through my own imprint -- that's where I make my money -- but it really is nice to let someone else deal with all the crap once in a while. Plus it keeps my name out there, finds me readers I couldn't find on my own, and lays to rest any ludicrous rumors about why I chose to self-publish (a certain segment is always hoping it wasn't the author's choice!) :-D

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  23. I've enjoyed how your experiments have turned out thus far, so bring on the test tubes, lab coats, and mad scientist hair!

    As for the rest, I'm a big fan of quality over quantity. This is something I've had to remind myself every time I reread the two Holmes and Moriarity books. I know it will be worth the wait. Then there are all those upcoming titles. Wow, those are sparking lots of curiosity and excitement. The Mermaid Murderer, hmmmm...

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    1. I'm very behind on answering comments -- and the mad scientist hair is only too appropriate!

      I hope the wait will be worth it. There are bound to be a few of the usual passive-aggressive OH THIS TOOK SO LONG I JUST DON'T CARE. (But then those people are idiots, so we're even)

      Wait. Did I just call someone an idiot? :-D

      I wish to state for the record that no mermaids were harmed in the making of The Mermaid Murders outline. I am using dolphin/mermaid safe fonts!

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    2. And which ones are those again? :)

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    3. LOL! Glad to know you are so conscience about your font choice. I wish more authors would give their readers the assurance of such environmentally sound font practices.

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  24. Hola, Josh:
    It seems to me that a writer has to write at your own pace and however you want at all times. I also write, but only tales and short stories, sometimes when I'm very inspired I bring my notebook everywhere but I have my bad days as well and I spend lengthy periods unable to write a single line.
    About your novels, I love mystery, but what I like the most is the way you write, so whatever the topic is, I will always like it.
    Besos.

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    1. Thank you, Minu.

      I do think writers should always carry notebooks.

      Actually, I think everyone over the age of 35 should carry a notebook because how can anyone ever remember anything nowdays? ;-)

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  25. I don't think it will ever be possible for you to write enough to satisfy everyone, but that's because you are such a wonderful story teller that fans can't get enough. I'm just glad your sabbatical helped you and that you are back to writing. And 2 novels left to look forward to this year, Great news! Also fun to anticipate a sequel to TGWYS, that's probably one of the stories I re-read the most...after AE, of course :)

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    1. Thank you so much for those words.

      I think fondly of sabbatical. I hope I fully appreciated the joy of being able to watch all the documentaries my brain could hold. But you're right, it did the trick and halfway through I was hungry -- starving -- to start writing again.

      Which is the really weird thing about creativity. Sometimes that's a faucet you can't turn off even when you need to.

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  26. Your output is great by any standards.

    The addicts are just concerned that you may be lowering the supply (Since you brought up the addict analogy).

    You are doing just fine.

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    1. You are very kind. Thank you.

      So long as none of my customers holds me at gunpoint demanding another bag of stories, I think we will be okay. ;-)

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  27. Stranger on the Shore is what makes me feel my top favorite writer is back. Sorry Josh, I am that long time old fan of yours who love your older gay mystery romance works and I am really too old (54 years old here) for experiments from my favorite writer. So I am very happy about the upcoming Fair Play and BWTPT. And glad to know there is more of Perry and Nick. Incidentally I just finished rereading TGWYS last week. But yes please have time for yourself, including lots of exercise (swimming). Thank you for this update.
    A fan, Nikki.

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    1. You know, Nikki, we all like what we like. That's a fact. Readers take their stories seriously and I think most writers have a healthy respect for that. :-)

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  28. The message I left before was gone...I guess I forgot to send to it.

    Fair Game and The Holmes & Moriarity are two of my favorite Series. I can't wait for Fair Play and BWTPT. I wish for more but I really got no complaint. I read Stranger on the Shore and Everything I know recently. I enjoyed them both though the initial unfairness in Everything I know really upset me. I'm not entirely satisfied with the ending (Con accepted to go back too easily). However, I guess it was already better than what could have happened in real life. Great work, again.

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    1. Ah. The not pressing SEND. That gets me a lot too. :-)

      Some readers definitely had problems with EIK. It's not a convenient story. Wes makes serious mistakes and there is no magical, fix-it-all ending.

      What can I say, I write what I like to read. :-)

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    2. haha, I wasn't referring to Wes. Yes, he was an ass but I kinda saw where his concern was coming from but the I was referring to Con being fired and hired back. I wish he at least told Bea he needed time to think before he accepted to take back the job. The bit** deserved some worry! lol

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    3. I know. But having been dead broke a number of times, I can guarantee you don't dither around, you grab the lifeline as hard as you can. And thank God for it.

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  29. Oh my goodness. There's going to be a sequel to The Ghost Wore Yellow Socks?? My knees just buckled.

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  30. You were one of the first m/m authors I ever read, and you set a high standard! No one else has really approached that standard for me (except Harper Fox), so I'm ecstatic that two more novels will come out this year. In the meantime, I'll just reread the Adrian English series.

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    1. Thank you. That's so kind of you! Harper is wonderful, isn't she? :-)

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  31. Ghost Wore Yellow Socks was actually one of my favorite works of yours. Something about that couple irked and intrigued me, yet I just wanted more more more. Every time I think about a book that I would kill to read a sequel of, it's GWYS.

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    1. How funny. :-D But I'm glad you're looking forward to the sequel.

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  32. Acabo de descubrir tu bloc, y me he emocionado tanto que como ves si tan siquiera te he saludado.
    Hola, buenas tardes desde Toledo (EspaƱa).
    Estoy realmente contenta de contar con nuevos trabajos de nuevas personas que disfrutan dando el placer de la lectura a sus seguidores. Solo espero disfrutar leyendo todo de ti como creo que tu disfrutas ecribiendo todo de ti.
    <un saludo Josh, nos leemos. Lola.

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  33. So having re read a ghost wore yellow socks and searching your blog for related topics i found this one in which you mention a sequel?! Awesome news! Is this still a possibility?

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  34. Why yes there is! ;-)

    http://www.joshlanyon.com/ghost_had_an_early_check_out.html

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